学生公开信比赛优胜者—A Letter From a ‘Loser’

这封信由 Ridge High School in Basking Ridge, N.J. 16 岁的 Anya Wang 撰写,是学习网络学生公开信竞赛的前 9 名获奖者之一,我们收到了 8,065 份参赛作品。

Dear The New York Times Learning Network,

I’m not sure if you imagined that someone would write a letter to you when you announced that we could write an open letter “to anyone you like.” Well, whether or not you did, here I am.

Don’t get me wrong. I admire your contests and resources deeply. But after three years of pouring hours into your contests yet receiving nothing but a copy-pasted rejection email in response, I want to bring a facet of your contests into scrutiny. A facet that you may have never thought twice about.

That is, your policy that you do not provide feedback on submitted essays.

I get it. You received 12,592 submissions for your last editorial contest. But after all, you’ve named yourself the Learning Network. Feedback is how students grow. It’s how we learn. Without it, every time I’ve received a “You lost!” email from you, I’ve felt sorely disappointed and lost, not knowing where to look or what to change to improve my writing.

And I know that I’m not alone. In fact, your contests leave the vast majority of your participants stranded in the dark. In last year’s editorial contest, the chance of getting recognized — not even winning — was a measly 1.199 percent. Winning was bestowed upon just 0.087 percent of your participants — a rate almost 40 times lower than Harvard’s class of 2027 acceptance rate.

You want to be prestigious. You want to be selective. But what you’re creating for the thousands of hopeful teens who enter your contests — nearly 100,000 in just your editorial contests alone — is not a network for learning and growth. Instead, you’re creating a cutthroat competition where feedback and encouragement are given at a rate even below what the Ivy League has deemed ethical. It’s discouraging and unresponsive — a culture far from conducive to learning.

Additionally, you’ve commonly mentioned a Round 4 in your recognized finalists, but never explained how Rounds 3, 2 and 1 work. I desperately want you to tell us more. What if you discreetly told each participant which round their essay reached, and then shared some general thresholds that prevented essays from proceeding to the next round?

I hope that won’t be too logistically difficult — you probably already need to sort essays into different rounds to determine contest winners. I also hope that you won’t balk at the supposed decrease in prestige such a change might bring. You’re a global leader in journalism. You know how things are for teens right now. You know, with the world changing at breakneck speed, with everything from A.I. to full-blown wars flung at us, how sharply teen voices demand to be heard.

Don’t leave us in the dark. Shine a ray of light into our writing, and prepare all teen voices to take the stage.

Signed,
A “Loser”


Works Cited

Harvard College Admissions and Financial Aid. Admissions Statistics | Harvard. Harvard College, 2024.

Schulten, Katherine. How to Write an Open Letter: A Guide to Our Opinion Contest. The New York Times, 19 March 2024.

The New York Times Learning Network. Open Letters: Our New Opinion-Writing Contest. The New York Times, 12 March 2024.

The New York Times Learning Network. The Israel-Hamas War: A Forum for Young People to React. The New York Times, 16 Oct. 2023.

The New York Times Learning Network. The Winners of Our 10th Annual Student Editorial Contest. The New York Times, 29 June 2023.

The New York Times Learning Network. What Students Are Saying About Learning to Write in the Age of A.I. The New York Times, 25 Jan. 2024.

学生公开信比赛优胜者—Insulin: Drugs vs. Dividends

这封信由印第安纳州布卢明顿市 Bloomington 高中 17 岁的奥利弗·博洪 (Oliver Bohon) 撰写,是学习网络学生公开信竞赛的前 9 名获奖者之一,我们收到了 8,065 份参赛作品。

Eli Lilly,

As a Type 1 diabetic living in Indiana (where you’re headquartered), I’ve known your name for a long time. Every meal I have your insulin delivered into my bloodstream, something I’ll need my entire life. But I’ve come to associate your name with frustration, not gratitude.

You, alongside Novo Nordisk and Sanofi, control 90-plus percent of the insulin market worldwide. You posture about capping costs, providing aid, serving the people first. These claims make you look great — you’re doing all you can to aid your patients.

Except you aren’t.

Frederick Banting, Charles Best, John Macleod and James Collip helped to discover and purify insulin in 1921. In 1923, Banting, Best and Collip sold their patents on the drug for $1 each.

The reason? As Banting said, “Insulin belongs to the world.”

Yet so many people today still find themselves on short supply of that miracle drug — rationing it, fighting with insurance over it, buying it from third parties.

What happened? We’re no longer in the days of purifying pig pancreas extract. We have synthetic biology! We can mass produce insulin — more than we’d ever need — and it’s cheap, easy, and efficient. It’s the simplest business imaginable. Think about it — I, alongside countless others, can’t survive without insulin. I’m reliant on you. So you got to work approaching my life like an economics class — there’s always demand, so why not increase prices?

But (eventually) political pressure started, and for once you seemed threatened. So, about a year ago, you announced that you’d limit the cost of a vial of non-branded insulin to $25. In the announcement, you boasted about how this is the lowest price since 1999.

The lowest price since 1999 still has a profit margin of 417 percent (at $6 per vial). Obviously, you’re a company — you exist to profit. But to claim you’re doing any charity with this is a farce. You gouged prices for decades, cut them down once any pressure was applied, and then acted a hero for it. Even the price cut wasn’t selfless! It helped you avoid millions of dollars of rebates under the American Rescue Act. You did the bare minimum and nothing more.

There’s an issue when a life-or-death drug can be played like a stock — where companies are incentivized to gouge the prices of their drugs for the patient while paying their C.E.O. $26.5 million per year.

I don’t have any power. I can’t boycott insulin, nor undo the pain you’ve caused. What I hope to share with this letter is that I’m tired. I’m tired of the Eli Lilly name being associated with greed over patient care. I’m tired and frustrated, and I think people have the right to understand why, and to determine whether such a company deserves support.

Oliver Bohon, a diabetic


Works Cited

100 Years of Insulin. Diabetes UK.

Feldman, William B, and Benjamin N Rome. The Rise and Fall of the Insulin Pricing Bubble. Vol. 6. JAMA Network Open. 14 June 2023.

Knox, Ryan. Insulin Insulated: Barriers to Competition and Affordability in the United States Insulin Market. Journal of Law and the Biosciences, Volume 7, Issue 1, January-June 2020.

Lilly Cuts Insulin Prices by 70% and Caps Patient Insulin Out-of-Pocket Costs at $35 per Month. Eli Lilly and Company New Release. 1 March 2023.

Robbins, Rebecca. Eli Lilly Says It Will Cut the Price of Insulin. The New York Times, 1 March 2023.

今年的社论写作竞赛有些新变化?新赛季《纽约时报》社论写作竞赛冲奖攻略!

参与高含金量的学术论文写作比赛对于学生来说是一项非常有利的活动,可以提升他们的背景和学术能力。其中,纽约时报每年举办的主题竞赛是全球最有影响力的比赛之一。

今年的社论写作竞赛有些新变化?

参赛者需要以针对个人但面向公众的公开信形式,提出论点,呼吁读者关心自己所论述的问题。

读者必须是一些特定的目标受众或群体。可以是老师、父母,可以是市长、国会议员,又或者是公司CEO,也可以是“硅谷”或“克里姆林宫”等隐喻的对象。

在写这封公开信的过程中,同学们得想清楚自己为什么关心这个问题,能够解决这个问题的特定群体是谁,如何能够让这个特定群体听从自己的建议,做出改变。而且还需要在针对特定读者的同时兼顾普通读者。

奖项设置:

Winners、Runners-up、Honorable Mentions、Round 3 Finalists

奖项会在比赛结束后两个月内公布。优秀的参赛作品将会被发表于纽约时报的“学与教”专栏(The Learning Network: Teaching and Learning With The New York Times),也有机会在《纽约时报》纸质报纸上发表。

尽管门槛相对较低,但想在这样的高含金量写作竞赛中脱颖而出并拿奖,固然需要一些策略和技巧:

1.充分了解竞赛规则:

首先,你需要仔细阅读并理解比赛的规则和要求。去年纽约时报收到了超过12000份作品,并评选出11位优胜者,12位亚军和33位荣誉奖获得者。想要在激烈的竞争中脱颖而出,对竞赛规则的了解就显得尤其重要。更多规则信息将很快发布,请持续关注我们。

2.精练议论:

篇幅只有450字这样的短文,需要你能够精练地进行议论,而这对你的写作技巧和思辨能力提出了高要求。你需要尽可能利用有限的篇幅,写出一篇极具说服力的论文。

3.专业的写作指导:

想要在如此激烈的角逐中脱颖而出拿到奖项,就必须要有专业的写作指导,为了助力大家冲奖,我们整理了历年优秀获奖论文集,还有资深导师开设的课程,针对性深度探讨文章,确保作品的深度和层次!现在扫码即可免费领取获奖论文,试听课程!

4.精细修改稿件:

切记一份优秀的作品往往需要经过反复的修改才能完成。你需要仔细审查你的文章,对每一处细节都进行严格的审查和精细的修改。

备赛辅导、赛事报名+了解更多赛事信息 ,请扫码添加顾问老师详细咨询!

纽约时报公开信竞赛解读!完美备赛攻略了解一下!

每年,纽约时报都会推出全新的主题竞赛,吸引着来自全球的成千上万的青少年投稿参赛。而且,这些比赛还采用了滚动开赛的形式,让你有足够的时间来准备和提交作品。无论你是新手还是有经验的参赛者,都能在这个平台上找到属于自己的舞台。

纽约时报公开信写作竞赛不仅对学生感兴趣的学科范围没有限制,其“公开信”写作中还能展现学生对于学科的热情、沟通能力、独立思考能力和思维逻辑等。

可以说在这项比赛中,写作已经不是最重要的考察项了。学生心中的“舞台”有多大,就能通过这项比赛,向大赛评审、甚至招生官直接去展现多大。

纽约时报提供了一些公开信写作思路,供大家参考:

我关心什么?

谁能做出或大或小、或地方性或全球性的改变来解决我的问题?

我具体想让他们了解什么、做什么?

我怎样才能把它写成一封 "公开信",不仅对我和收信人有意义,而且对广大受众也有意义?

纽约时报公开信的“完美”写作攻略:

定位主题:在写作前,需要确认公开信的中心主旨,即信件的中心内容和写作目的。这有助于确保信件的表达重点清晰明确,让读者能够准确理解你的观点和呼吁。

定位读者:选择一个有能力做出有意义改变的目标受众或接受者、机构或团体。这是公开信写作竞赛中的一条重要考察项。需要注意的是,选择的目标受众既要有能力做出改变,又要对广大读者有意义。

在读者选择上,竞赛方对“改变的能力”并没有做出具体要求,因此,学生可以选择具有不同影响力和能力的读者,如父母、学校老师、市长、某个机构的领导者等。这为学生提供了较大的发挥空间,可以根据自己的观点和目的选择合适的目标受众。

综合来看,公开信的“完美”写作攻略主要包括确定中心主题和目的,以及选择合适的目标受众,确保信件内容的准确性和针对性。

春季纽约时报写作竞赛开启!扫码了解课程详情!

低门槛写作竞赛!今年的《纽约时报》社论写作竞赛有哪些新变化?

《纽约时报》为了鼓励学生将从学校中学到的知识转变为创造力,从而提升写作能力,今年将举办10个不同类型的比赛。这些给予你发挥的机会不仅为你提供了展示才能的平台,同时也帮助你锻炼写作能力和思考能力,使你更加全面发展。

如果你渴望在国际舞台上展示自己,如果你想让你的声音和想法传遍世界,那么纽约时报中学生系列竞赛是你实现梦想的机会。纽约时报社论写作竞赛是中国学生参赛人数最多的一项竞赛!

赛事说明

参赛题目:一封公开信

参赛规则:提交一篇不超过450字(不含标题)的文章

参赛时间:2024年3月13日—2024年4月17日

参赛人群:13-19岁的初高中学生

今年的社论写作竞赛有哪些新变化?

今年的社论写作竞赛的新变化要求参赛者以公开信的形式针对个人但面向公众,提出论点并呼吁特定的目标受众关心所论述的问题。这种写作形式要求不仅要考虑如何引起特定目标受众的关注,还要兼顾普通读者的理解和共鸣。

在写这封公开信的过程中,参赛者需要深思熟虑以下几个方面:

1.关心的问题:清楚阐述为何关心所论述的问题,表达个人的观点和立场,以及对问题的关注和重视。

2.特定群体:明确能够解决这个问题的特定群体是谁,例如老师、父母、市长、国会议员、公司CEO等,以及如何能够让这个特定群体听从自己的建议,做出改变。

3.吸引普通读者:在针对特定读者的同时兼顾普通读者,要求参赛者的观点能够引起广泛的共鸣和理解,让普通读者也能够从中获得启发和思考。

这种写作形式要求参赛者在表达个人观点的同时,考虑如何有效地传达给特定的目标受众,并且能够触动普通读者,具有一定的挑战性和思考深度。

备赛学习、赛事报名+了解更多赛事信息 ,请扫码添加顾问老师详细咨询!

门槛低含金量高!纽约时报社论写作竞赛了解一下!

纽约时报学生系列竞赛自从推出以来就备受广大美本申请者的青睐。这个比赛不仅在美国,在全球范围内吸引了成千上万的中学生的参与。不论是文科还是理科,参与纽约时报学生系列竞赛都对中学生的英语写作能力进行了锻炼和提升。

学生社论比赛是为了鼓励参赛选手拓展新闻敏感度和国际视野而设立的比赛。该比赛旨在针对美国的政治、经济、社会等领域,让参赛选手发表独到的评论。参赛选手需要基于事实进行有逻辑的、系统性的新闻评论,主要目的是发表作者对当下社会重大事件的立场和分析。

适合学生

全球11-19岁学生(纽约时报工作人员子女不能参加)
内容:选择一个你关心的话题(不管它是不是在纽约时报网站上讨论的话题)然后从《纽约时报》内外的来源收集证据,写一篇简明的社论

这篇社论文章需要具备逻辑性,要清晰地陈述问题,给出有说服力的论据并得出合理的结论。

更新的部分:

2024年有了全新的变化:要求参赛者利用相同的技能和热情来陈述观点,但这次是以公开信的形式。

公开信是一种公开发表的抗议或呼吁信,通常是针对个人的,但面向公众。Martin Luther King在伯明翰监狱写的信,最近由1000多名科技领袖签署的关于人工智能危险的信,以及2020年写给哈里和梅根的有趣的信,都是这一丰富传统的例子。

2022年的获奖情况

纽约时报中学生社论竞赛(New York Times Student Review Contest)今年一共有16,664位学生提交了文章其中11名学生获得优胜奖(Winners),18名学生获得二等奖(Runners-up),53名学生获得荣誉奖(Honorable Mentions)。获奖率为0.49%,而优胜奖的获奖率仅为0.07%。

学生社论比赛为青年学生提供了展示自己才华和观点的机会。透过撰写社论,学生们不仅可以增加对社会问题的关注和理解,还可以锻炼自己的逻辑思维和表达能力。

备赛学习、赛事报名+了解更多赛事信息 ,请扫码添加顾问老师详细咨询!

2024年《纽约时报》中学生社论竞赛备赛开启!比赛时间&奖项设置&作品要求一文说清!

《纽约时报》在美国报刊中的发行量排名第三,参赛作品来自世界各地,该比赛的权威性是不容置疑的。参加纽约时报写作比赛不仅可以锻炼写作能力,还能够提升申请时的个人品牌价值。

2024年新变化

2024年新赛季《纽约时报》社论写作竞赛有了大手笔的改动——

以公开信的形式,阐述你的观点。

参赛相关

投稿时间

2024年3月13日—2024年4月17日

创作形式

不超过450个单词的文章(不含标题)

面向群体

13-19岁中学生

作品要求

就你关心的主题发表450字的论文,并说服读者接受你的观点。参赛话题可大可小,从国际局势、种族歧视、气候变化、校园枪击,到电玩文化、网络用语等,都可以成为文章的主题。

但这次,你的文章应该有一个具体的收信人,并且他有能力改变这一现象。

奖项设置

奖项项级别分别为:

Winners

Runners-up

Honorable-Mentions

Round-3-Finalists

奖项会在比赛结束后两个月内公布。

优秀的参赛作品将会被发表于纽约时报的The Learning Network: Teaching and Learning With The New York Times专栏,也有机会在《纽约时报》的纸质报纸上发表。

一篇高质量的原创社论可以从侧面体现申请者对国际时事政治的关注度和理解能力,对于申请者在面试中展示自己的综合素质和学术能力具有重要意义。在面试官眼中,这样的社论无疑是一个加分项。

通过撰写原创社论,你可以展示你对国际时事的深入思考和独特观点的表达能力。这不仅要求你对相关话题有一定的了解,还需要你能够分析问题、提出见解,并用逻辑和证据支持你的观点。

2024纽约时报社论竞赛备赛已开启,扫码免费领取【获奖作品集】!

《纽约时报》官推竞赛!参与社论竞赛有何意义?

学术竞赛和学术活动是展示学生学术能力的最佳途径之一。参与学术竞赛和活动能够为学生在大学申请中脱颖而出并获得录取机会。通过在学术竞赛中取得名次或展现出色表现,学生能够证明自己在学术方面的能力和潜力。

纽约时报学生系列竞赛以其严格的评选标准和广泛的话题范围而闻名。学生们可以选择在各种各样的话题上发表自己的观点和见解。这既培养了学生独立思考和表达的能力,也让他们有机会通过写作来影响和启发他人。

适合学生:年龄在13至19岁的初中或高中学生都可以参加

关于评审的问题

我的社论将如何被评判?

你的作品将由《纽约时报》的记者,以及来自美国各地教育工作者阅读。

什么时候宣布获奖者?

大约在比赛结束后两个月。

参与社论竞赛有何意义?

参与纽约时报学生系列竞赛对学生的英语写作能力有着显著的提升作用。学生们需要用准确、生动并且富有表达力的语言来阐述自己的观点。他们需要通过逻辑思维和合理的论证来支撑自己的论点。参赛经历使得学生们更加熟悉学术写作的规范和技巧,提高了他们的写作水平。

近年来,越来越多被藤校录取的学生都有参加纽约时报学生系列竞赛并且获奖的经历。这一点也表明,纽约时报学生系列竞赛不仅对学生的英语写作能力有所帮助,还能够为他们的申请加分。藤校一直注重学生的综合素质和学术能力,而参与纽约时报学生系列竞赛的经历能够展示学生的独特性和才华。

纽约时报学生系列竞赛对于中学生的英语写作能力的提升起着积极的作用。它不仅为学生提供了锻炼和展示自己的机会,还能够为他们的藤校申请增加亮点。参与纽约时报学生系列竞赛已经成为很多学生追求学术和职业发展的重要一环。无论是对于英语写作能力的提升还是对于未来的发展,这个比赛都具有重要的意义。

备赛学习、赛事报名+了解更多赛事信息 ,请扫码添加顾问老师详细咨询!

2024年《纽约时报》社论写作竞赛更新规则!作品形式&要求&奖项设置&获奖率

《纽约时报》的Student Editorial Contest已经举办了十年,2024年有了全新的变化:要求参赛者利用相同的技能和热情来陈述观点,但这次是以公开信的形式。

公开信是一种公开发表的抗议或呼吁信,通常是针对个人的,但面向公众。Martin Luther King在伯明翰监狱写的信,最近由1000多名科技领袖签署的关于人工智能危险的信,以及2020年写给哈里和梅根的有趣的信,都是这一丰富传统的例子。

时间:2024年3月13日—2024年4月17日

形式:不超过450个单词(不含标题)的文章

面向群体:13-19岁中学生

作品形式&要求

邀请你就你关心的事情发表450字的论点,并说服我们也应该关心。但这一次,你必须针对一个特定的目标受众或接受者、机构或团体——他们有能力做出有意义的改变。

官方提示:无论你选择你的父母、老师、学校董事会成员还是市长;国会议员;公司的首脑;或者是“硅谷”或“克里姆林宫”这样的转喻,问问自己,我关心什么?谁能做出改变,或大或小,本地或全球,解决我的问题或问题?我具体想让他们理解什么,做什么?我怎样才能把这封“公开信”写得不仅对我和收信人有意义,而且对普通读者也有意义呢?

奖项设置:

Winners、Runners-up、Honorable Mentions、Round 3 Finalists

奖项会在比赛结束后两个月内公布。优秀的参赛作品将会被发表于纽约时报的“学与教”专栏(The Learning Network: Teaching and Learning With The New York Times),也有机会在《纽约时报》纸质报纸上发表。

获奖率:比赛结束后大约两个月公布获奖信息。2022年参赛的16,664个作品中,11个winners, 18个runners-up,53个honorable mention,综合获奖率不到0.5%。

在写一篇出色的社论时,你需要注意以下三点:

首先,选择你感兴趣的话题。确保你选择的话题是你真正感兴趣的,只有基于兴趣和自身经历,才能够有所思并写出能够打动他人的文章。

其次,要言简意赅。由于字数限制,你需要简明扼要地表达观点。论点要简明清晰,论据要充分,这样才能写出一篇很好的社论文章。

第三,研究获奖范文。在评审方面,纽约时报已经制定了一套完善的打分体系,包括论点、论据、分析和说服力、语言、规范这五个方面。如果你想冲奖,最好可以研读一下往年的获奖作品,从中找到一些灵感和借鉴。

扫码获取更多赛事详情!